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NYC Syllabus

Week 1: January 27th
Introduction to Urban Design Research + Spatial Analysis
-
- Discuss assigned readings from Reinhold Martin and Kadambari Baxi.  2007.  Multi-National City: architectural itineraries. Barcelona: Actar and Rem Koolhaas etl. al. eds.
- Go over Tumblr blogs, Google MyMaps, Dropbox



HOMEWORK:
Assignment: Locate an area in your neighborhood organized around food that brings different kinds of people together (e.g. market, farm, bodega, church, repair shop, private home, gallery, etc.).  Write a blog post that outlines the site condition and site programming, identifies the physical, social, economic and cultural flows in the space, lists the food networks it connects to, and how the site succeeds in facilitating co-existence and exchange and diffusing, avoiding or preventing conflict. Include 4 original images (2 photos, 1 diagram and 1 custom Google map - share your map with Cityaslab@gmail.com ).  Write 250-500 words of text explaining your site selection and mapping process. This initial mapping study will be the basis for the assignment, Local Food Map 1 due 2/17.



READINGS:

Kevin Lynch. 1960. The Image of the City. Cambridge: The MIT Press.



Sze Tsung Leong, “…And Then There Was Shopping: The last remaining form of public life” and “Control Space” in Chuihua Judy Chung, et. al. eds. 2002. Harvard Design School Guide to Shopping. Cambridge: Harvard School of Design.

Week 2: February 3rd - Urban Edges + Interventions
Concepts and terms: urban edges, enclaves, archetypes, suburbanization, urbanization, spatialization, network, map, diagram, gentrification, global city, guerilla architecture, temporary installation, urban intervention, performance research
.

Discussion of  Volume 11: Cities Unbuilt.  New York: Columbia University Archis. 2007, Lynch’s urban components and shopping logic.

Friday, 2/4/10 9AM:
Exploring a Global City Enclave
- Group or independent site visit to Standard Hotel, High Line, and Union Square Farmers Market.  



HOMEWORK:

Project 2: You are what you eat - due 2/24
To get the semester started we’d like for you to introduce yourself. But this being a studio on housing and food, we’d like you refrain from reciting your CV and instead show us what goes inside your mouth. This first exercise is a visualization of the relationship you have with food in Lebanon. We need to see our food in our environment in order to react with an appropriate design. This not only provides a great perspective for yourself, your classmates, but our colleagues in New York City, as they will as well introduce themselves to us in terms of the food they eat.

Requirements:
Document your eating and buying habits for a period no less than 5 days. Utilizing a number of different medias and documenting tools how can you present to us a visualization of your food consumption patterns in relationship to home and school. Where do you buy it, where do you prepare it, where do you eat it, where do you throw out the waste?

Students are encouraged to use video as a form of visualization (max 5 minutes!) but other forms of documentation are allowed (mappings, slideshows, audio, blogs, googlemaps, etc)

Deliverables:
Video files (in presentable format - ie, .mov, .mpeg, .wmv or compatible no more than 5 minutes long). File must be small enough to easily upload to class blog, or printed mapping, diagram or images (to also be scanned to uploaded), or digital presentation (no more than 5 mins) that can include multi-media. (Basically, use a format that works for you and tailor it suit your needs as per the assignment.)

READINGS:

Jon Calame and Esther Ruth Charlesworth.  2009. Divided Cities: Belfast, Beirut, Jerusalem, Mostar and Nicosia.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.



Week 3: February 10th
Intro to Design Problems - Reading Conflict in Space
- Concepts and terms: territory, zoning, place, space, non-place, space of exception, landscape, mediascape, de-territorialization, global city, urban planning and architecture as medium for conflict
- Extract components of the global city from the High Line, Standard Hotel, 14th Street and Union Square

HOMEWORK:

Food Map 1 - draft 2
You are what you eat - draft 1

READINGS + VIDEOS:

Michael Pollan, “Eat your view,” The New York Times
Good Magazine, Food for Thinkers
The Food Print Project
Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution
Anthony Bourdain in Beirut
Selections from Carolyn Steel. 2008. Hungry City: How Food Shapes Our Lives.  London: Chatto & Windus.


====== PART 2: LOCAL/GLOBAL FOOD NETWORKS ======

Week 4: 2/17 
Mapping the City’s food
*Food Map 1 - Final version due in class - students will give short presentations*



HOMEWORK:
You are what you eat

READINGS:
Various articles on Souk el Tayeb
Grow NYC
Carrot City
Five Borough Farm
East NY Local Farmers

Week 5: 2/24 
Local Food Networks
You are what you eat - Final version due in class
Panel Presentation and Discussion: Chloe Bass - Superfront Derek Denckla - The Greenist, Stephanie Pereira

 - Eyebeam

HOMEWORK:

Begin Project 3 - Video project profiling one farmer and farmers’ market in NYC.

READINGS:

Selections from Projections, Volume 8, MIT Journal of Planning, Justice, Equity + Sustainability,  2008.



Selections from J. Matthew Thomas. 2011.  Yearbook: Lebanon; Current States of Sustainability 2009-2010.  Taos: Studio Viga.



Week 6: 3/3 
DIY Mapping Site
Workshop with Jennifer Hudon on DIY aerial mapping - she works in collaboration with grassroots mapping

HOMEWORK:

Work on Project 3 

READINGS:

Hashim Sarkis, etl. al.  Two squares: Martyrs Square, Beirut and Sirkeci Square, Istanbul.  Cambridge: Harvard University, Graduate School of Design.



Hashim Sarkis - “Beirut Beirut” lecture at MIT, 2008
"At the Edge of the City" AUB lecture, 2010 

Week 7: 3/10
Guest lecturer: Shin-pei Tsay,
Director, Transportation Solvency
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
and Co-Founder of Planning Corps

Local Foods and Farmers Markets in Beirut -
Recorded interview/workshop with Kamal and Christine, from Souk el Tayeb



HOMEWORK:

Blog post TBD - NYC + Beirut



READINGS:

Bryan Bell and Katie Wakeford. 2008.  Expanding Architecture Design as Activism.  New York: Metropolis Books.



Michel de Certaeu. 1984. The Practice of Everyday Life. Berkeley: University of California Press.



Week 8: 3/24 
Participatory Action Research

Security Architecture.

Guest lecturer and workshop by Christopher Robbins 7-8:50PM.


Final, edited videos due on the blogs - to be posted on the City as Lab Vimeo channel.

HOMEWORK:

Break up into pairs and design an urban intervention that could be implemented in NYC and Beirut with the intention of educating about, rendering transparent or altering food consumption. Bring 4-5 original images that illustrate your concept and situate the interventions in specific locations. be prepared to present to the class.

  You will have access to site documentation and research from your colleagues in Beirut.

READINGS:

Reference these urban art projects as you develop your own.

Watch “Inside/Outside”

Florian Hayden and Robert Temel eds.  2006. Temporary Urban Spaces: Concepts for the Use of City Spaces.  Basel: Birkhauser.  



Week 9: 3/31 
FARMER Videos due in class - screenings and short presentations

HOMEWORK:

Blog post TBD - NYC + Beirut



READINGS:

David Harvey.  “The Right to the City.”  New Left Review. Vol. 53, October-September 2008.

“Fear and Money in Dubai” by Mike Davis; pp. 52-72. “Palm Springs: Imagineering California in Hong Kong” by Laura Ruggeri; pp. 106-117. “Arg-e Jadid: A California Oasis in the Iranian Desert” by Marina Forti; pp. 38-51 in Mike Davis and Daniel Bertrand Monk. 2007. Evil Paradises and Dreamworlds of Neoliberalism. New York: The New Press.



Stephan Zacks, “Beyond the Spectacle,” Metropolis Magazine, November 2007.

====== PART III: Design Studio ======
Week 10: 4/7 
Writing the design problem 1 (Beirut + NYC)

- Break up into research and design teams for final design projects
- Review work by Beirut students on living pods for NYC Farmers Market - send written feedback



HOMEWORK:

First draft of design proposal posted to the blog, including documentation of design process (e.g. photographs from site visits, mappings, diagrams, and sketches).  Correspond with Beirut students to ask for site documentation and resources for Beirut sites.



Week 11: 4/14 
Writing the Design Problem 2 (Beirut + NYC)

HOMEWORK:
Second draft of design proposal posted to the blog, including documentation of design process.  Solicit and respond to feedback from Beirut students.



Week 12: 4/21 
Design Studio 1 - desk crits
Substitute + guest lecturer: David Mahfouda of Weeels

HOMEWORK:

Test prototype of design intervention.



Week 13: 4/28 
Design Studio 2 - desk crits



HOMEWORK:

Based on feedback from in-class critique and from colleagues in Beirut, adjust design intervention and implement 2nd round of prototyping and testing in the field. Prepare final presentation slides: 20 slides, 30 seconds per slide.  Presentations can also take the form of a video that can be no longer than 6 minutes.



Week 14: 5/5
Rehearsal of final presentations and final feedback session

Week 15: 5/12 
Final Presentation - Pecha Kucha format, open to the public

(Guest critics: Carina Molnar, CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities; David Mahfouda of Weeels; Stephanie Pereira, Eyebeam Art+ Technology Center; Dan Latorre, Project for Public Spaces)

Project 1: Food Map 1 due 2/17 
VIEW ALL ASSIGNMENTS 1
Local Food Map + Diagram NYC - Individual Assignment

Create a map and accompanying diagram that documents and the spatialization of a particular food network as situated in your neighborhood.  Students will also write a short essay (750-1,000 words) explaining the mapping process and analyzing the spatial patterns and flows observed and represented through this study.

Assignment 2: You Are What you Eat - due 2/24
VIEW ALL ASSIGNMENTS 2

To get the semester started we’d like for you to introduce yourself. But this being a studio on housing and food, we’d like you refrain from reciting your CV and instead show us what goes inside your mouth. This first exercise is a visualization of the relationship you have with food in Lebanon. We need to see our food in our environment in order to react with an appropriate design. This not only provides a great perspective for yourself, your classmates, but our colleagues in New York City, as they will as well introduce themselves to us in terms of the food they eat.

Requirements:
Document your eating and buying habits for a period no less than 5 days. Utilizing a number of different medias and documenting tools how can you present to us a visualization of your food consumption patterns in relationship to home and school. Where do you buy it, where do you prepare it, where do you eat it, where do you throw out the waste?

Students are encouraged to use video as a form of visualization (max 5 minutes!) but other forms of documentation are allowed (mappings, slideshows, audio, blogs, googlemaps, etc)

Deliverables:
Video files (in presentable format - ie, .mov, .mpeg, .wmv or compatible no more than 5 minutes long). File must be small enough to easily upload to class blog. Or printed mapping, diagram or images (to also be scanned to uploaded) or Digital presentation (no more than 5 mins) that can include multi-media. (Basically, use a format that works for you and tailor it suit your needs as per the assignment)

Project 3: Food Map - VIDEO 
Presentation and working version - due 3/10 

Final Edits - due after spring break, 3/24
Farmers Market NYC - Pairs or Small Groups
Select one farmer to interview, profile and build a user and site study based on his/her .  Create a short video, no longer than 5 minutes, that illustrates, analyzes and provides a user study at the Union Square Farmers Market or another market in NYC, and how it relates to conditions and qualities of the global city. 

- Proximity to other food, social, cultural, economic functions
- Integration/Isolation from urban fabric
- Environmental factors (water catchment, light, shade, power, waste)

FINAL PROJECT: Design Intervention in Public Space
(Beirut, NYC, and Virtual)

- Small Groups

1st Draft due 5/5

Final Version due 5/12


Design brief with specific design parameters and assignment instructions to be issued to students on 4/7.  Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with an existing organization, artist or project (e.g. Jen Hudon’s grassroots mapping, Liz Kueneke and Adriana Young’s Urban Fabric project, Chloe Bass hydroponic and roof gardens, David Mahfouda of Weeels, Christopher Robbin’s Ghana Think Tank, etc.)



Grading
- Project 1 - Food Map - 10%
- Project 2 - You are what you eat - 10% 

- Project 3 - Video - 20%
- Final Project - 20%
- In-Class Participation and Attendance - 20%
   
Missing 3 classes is automatic grounds for failure.
   
Use of cellphone unrelated to class exercise = 1 absence
    Sleeping = 1 absence
  
Two lates (arriving 10 minutes after class start time) = 1 absence


- NYC Blog Participation -  10%

- Beirut Blog Participation - 10%

Each student will maintain an individual blog using the Tumblr platform and follow the class Tumblr site. Weekly blog posts will be assigned for the first 10 weeks of the course and then students will blog independently as they document the process of their final projects. Each blog post will consist of 2-3 paragraphs of text and 3-4 supporting images. Blogs are due and must be posted by midnight on the Wednesday before class. I will then review and reblog the posts to the class Tumblr site on Thursday morning so that a compendium of individual posts will be ready to be reviewed in class on Thursday evening. Students are expected to consistently review updates to the class blog, to read and comment on their peers’ blogs, and submit discussion questions and add to the lists of resources.  In addition, students are required to follow, read and comment on the blogs of their colleagues in Beirut.